DAS for one member of the group

lorenae

I'm going to Disney World!
Joined
Sep 12, 2015
I hate to even consider it, but I think I need DAS for my January trip. My issue is private and not known among many friends, but I have a neurological disease similar to MS. Even my brother doesn't know about this. My kids (grown) do, and my grandsons know a little since I take them to the fair and things.

I'm doing extremely well, and usually do fine in my day to day life many days. The problem is my legs. Sometimes I do fairly well, and can walk some distance most days. The issue is standing. I can stand sometimes for quite a while, but other times I have to sit down RIGHT NOW or I will collapse- my legs just give up without much warning. This happened in an airport TSA line recently, and I had no choice to sit down at all. I just had about 5 seconds with some tingling in my legs, and knew I was going down. I don't think I could stand still more than about 15 minutes usually, but sometimes it's more and sometimes it's less. Fatigue makes it worse, and I foresee that being an issue at WDW.

Hopefully, I won't even need to use it and it won't be an issue for me.

Anyway, I will be arriving about a day and half before my friend. My understanding is that she has to be seen or her magicband scanned(?) along with me? So I could go on Saturday and get the DAS, but then once she arrives, I would have to do it again.

She knows a little about my illness, but I haven't told her about the falling which would freak her out I"m sure. She likes to "mother" people anyway- feeding me a peanut butter sandwich once when we were traveling together because I looked hungry I guess. We don't see each other often since we don't live near each other, but she will have to be told if I get a DAS.

I'm unsure exactly how to go about this, so any tips would be great!
 

gap2368

DIS Veteran
Joined
Feb 27, 2015
You will need to let the CM know your concerns for the line. If it has anything to do with standing too long walking then there is a chance you will not be giving a DAS as this can be seen as mobility problems. Eve n with the DAS you can be waiting in the line for 10-20 ( sometimes more) minutes. There is really no way to hid the fact you have a DAS from your friend. you can go before she get there and then have her go with you and just ask for her to be added to your DAS.

with this sa when you go to GR I would not talk about the fact you can not stand and some time you will fall as this is mobility problem and there is a change that you will be told to get a mobility device ( wheelchair ECV roller ) to help with this. If you do not want to talk about your problem out loud just write down your concerns and let the CM know you wrote some concerns for the line down as you do not want to talk about them. they are good about reading note but not DR note
 
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Hoodie

<font color=purple>Going to BC and GF with one wee
Joined
Jun 3, 2008
Yes, she will need to know about the DAS if you chose to attach her to it. As gap said - there is a chance you may not be given it as it relates to mobility issues. Also, you should try to be prepared for waiting with a DAS as well - in pre-show areas, even in the FP line as it can take awhile. Even if you come to a point of needing to sit immediately, there really is no where to do it, especially as they have removed a lot of the benches and seating. Pushing a wheelchair or rollator may help. It would give you a place to sit when you need it - even immediately - and may help with balance and walking. Keep a space in line so you can pace, if needed. Also, remember that Disney isn't reflective of your normal day to day. It is not unusual to walk 8+ miles in a day.
 
  • Starwind

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    May 7, 2014
    A few things.

    First, IF you get the DAS... you can go alone your first day, get the DAS from guest services, and then the day your friend comes, the two of you go to guest services and all you will have to say is that you want to add your friend to your DAS. You won't have to go through any explanation again, it is just an administrative task of adding your friend. Separately you can decide how much or how little to tell them.

    On a practical level though. You may wish to give serious consideration to how you are going to tackle WDW on a functional / practical level.

    DAS is not intended for strictly mobility or stamina-related issues. WDW's usual solution for those is for the guest to use a mobility device such as an ECV, wheelchair, rollator or cane. They normally don't issue a DAS for such issues. So if the issue is you can't stand for a long time, that is usually interpreted as a mobility/stamina issue and the solution is a mobility device which gives you your own mobile seat.

    The DAS is for those who need to spend their time waiting *somewhere other than the line environment*; i.e. their issue is with being IN the line environment, and therefore being able to spend the time waiting elsewhere is "better" in some way(s). But they still wait. When you request the DAS, you will need to frame why you need it in terms of why waiting IN the line environment is problematic and/or why being able to wait outside the line environment would be helpful. They don't need or want the diagnosis, they are focussed on the need(s).

    You say you can walk some distance. Does this mean a limited distance [i.e. not very long distances] ? A typical park-goer will easily walk many miles each day -- upwards of 8 to 10 or more. I know for myself, I can handle my normal day to day walking at home, but I cannot handle the kind of standing and walking WDW requires -- I learned the very painful way my limit at WDW is <2 hours [3 hours and I am in severe pain, 4 and I can barely walk at all]. So I have to use an ECV at Disney [and also when I visit something like a Zoo for a day].

    Likewise, you explained you will have a sudden need to be able to sit down. DAS doesn't give you that. While it lets you wait outside the standard line, WDW has few benches and other seating except in restaurants. If you NEED a seat, especially *now* with little or no warning, you are best to bring your own in the form of a mobility device unless you plan to sit on the ground (which is not always possible or feasible). In addition, with DAS while you won't wait in the standby line, when you return to the attraction after spending your time waiting elsewhere, you will enter the Fastpass line and will wait in it -- which could be anything from near walk-on to a typically 5 to 10 to 20 minute wait depending on the ride/time of day/time of year. There are no benches or places to sit in the lines, except the ground itself, unless you bring your own mobility device with a seat; and since the lines are almost always making slow progress, sitting on the ground isn't really a viable option either as you would obstruct the line.

    SW
     

    DisneyOma

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Jul 27, 2015
    OP, are you planning on watching any parades or fireworks? Whether you are granted a DAS or not, I'd consider renting a wheelchair so you'd have a seat if you were hoping to see the parades or fireworks. Benches at WDW are very few and far between, and fill up hours ahead of time for parades and fireworks. You wouldn't have to stay in the wheelchair - you could just push it around, and have your own seat ready :)
     

    SueM in MN

    combining the teacups with a roller coaster
    Moderator
    Joined
    Aug 23, 1999
    I'm doing extremely well, and usually do fine in my day to day life many days. The problem is my legs. Sometimes I do fairly well, and can walk some distance most days. The issue is standing. I can stand sometimes for quite a while, but other times I have to sit down RIGHT NOW or I will collapse- my legs just give up without much warning. This happened in an airport TSA line recently, and I had no choice to sit down at all. I just had about 5 seconds with some tingling in my legs, and knew I was going down. I don't think I could stand still more than about 15 minutes usually, but sometimes it's more and sometimes it's less. Fatigue makes it worse, and I foresee that being an issue at WDW.
    No one can say for sure whether DAS will be issued or not. It provides a place to wait outside the line for people whose disability prevents them from waiting in the regular line. So, in asking for it, guests need to explain their needs that prevent waiting in line.

    But, for the reasons I bolded from your post, I don’t think DAS will be particularly helpful for you and you really need a mobility device.
    Most people walk at least 5 - 8 miles per day at a Disney park. Much of the walking is outside of the lines, just getting from place to place.

    At most attractions, the line is continually moving forward - some are fast, some slow. But, there are many attractions where the line moves fairly quickly, then stops totally for a few up to 10 minutes before moving again - this is usually for attractions that load in ‘batches’ and/or there is a preshow guests need to go thru. Examples include Test Track, Star Tours, Flight of Passage and Soarin’
    Guests also need to stand while waiting for shows - example Voyage of the Little Mermaid, Festival of the Lion King, Laugh Floor, Mickey’s Philharmagic, American Adventure .
    Shows like that have a holding area where enough guests are gathered to ‘load’ the next show. The wait in that holding area is usually equal to the length of the show.
    Lines and holding areas don’t have seats, so if you have a sudden need to sit, there won’t be a place to sit unless you are using a mobility device in lines/attractions.

    Besides attractions, there are other places guests wait in line - things like restaurants and even bathrooms when it’s really super busy.
    If you plan on watching any parades or fireworks, that’s another involving standing without anywhere to sit.

    So, whether you try to request DAS or not, a mobility device is going to be more helpful for your situation than DAS. Many people who can walk, but need a place to sit frequently or urgently use devices like rollators (walkers with wheels and a fold down seat. They can be brought into lines and are handled just like wheelchairs.

    Hope you have a good trip.
     

    lorenae

    I'm going to Disney World!
    Joined
    Sep 12, 2015
    I thank you for all your advice! There is no way I will rent a mobility device- I definitely can walk and move very well on all but the very worst days. In Italy in May, my longest walking day (according to Fitbit) was 11.3 miles. I'll admit my legs were tired, but I did fine. The only issues were standing still, and luckily that didn't happen much. I couldn't wait in a museum line that didn't move, but if the line moved at a pretty brisk pace I did fine.

    I didn't realize that not being able to stand still for 15 minutes would be not considered an issue for a DAS type of thing. I know that many people have disabilities that aren't apparent, but assumed that being unable to stand for long periods would qualify as an issue. I can usually walk wherever I need to, and even do ok on stairs as a rule if not fatigued. I wouldn't have any issue waiting, if I could walk.
     
  • StarGirl11

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Feb 8, 2012
    I hate to even consider it, but I think I need DAS for my January trip. My issue is private and not known among many friends, but I have a neurological disease similar to MS. Even my brother doesn't know about this. My kids (grown) do, and my grandsons know a little since I take them to the fair and things.

    I'm doing extremely well, and usually do fine in my day to day life many days. The problem is my legs. Sometimes I do fairly well, and can walk some distance most days. The issue is standing. I can stand sometimes for quite a while, but other times I have to sit down RIGHT NOW or I will collapse- my legs just give up without much warning. This happened in an airport TSA line recently, and I had no choice to sit down at all. I just had about 5 seconds with some tingling in my legs, and knew I was going down. I don't think I could stand still more than about 15 minutes usually, but sometimes it's more and sometimes it's less. Fatigue makes it worse, and I foresee that being an issue at WDW.

    Hopefully, I won't even need to use it and it won't be an issue for me.

    Anyway, I will be arriving about a day and half before my friend. My understanding is that she has to be seen or her magicband scanned(?) along with me? So I could go on Saturday and get the DAS, but then once she arrives, I would have to do it again.

    She knows a little about my illness, but I haven't told her about the falling which would freak her out I"m sure. She likes to "mother" people anyway- feeding me a peanut butter sandwich once when we were traveling together because I looked hungry I guess. We don't see each other often since we don't live near each other, but she will have to be told if I get a DAS.

    I'm unsure exactly how to go about this, so any tips would be great!
    Hey popping in because your issue sounds like a more extreme version of what I deal with. Mines not I will pass out if I sit down but I will start tilting and be prone to a possible fall. I’ve injured my shoulder a couple of times from tilting while walking without a mobility device.

    I had a discussion with GR at DL just four days ago when renewing my DAS. Since yes I still use the DAS even with my mobility device since I need to stay out of the line for other reasons in addition to the fall risk. I bring this up since the CM working with me said to emphasise the fall risk. The CM I talked to said they don’t want people in the regular line who are fall risks. Which makes sense for a few reasons.

    However I also agree with Sue. Mobility devices are a godsend. I got a rollator in 2016 and its really helped my park going a ton. I know how hard it can get to acknowledge that you need one considering how freaking random the episodes get. I get its hard to wrap your head around the idea of needing one for such a sporadic condition. But trust me having the freedom of not having to worry that you may have pushed too much and having an episode is entirely worth it.

    Look into both options is what I’m saying.
     

    gap2368

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Feb 27, 2015
    just a warning I feel like my spelling is more off then normal on this post I have tried but hopeful this post is readable :)


    I really do wish you would consider a mobility device and not look at your ego ( or what ever is holding you back)

    Although a very different problems I have a hard time in noise envierment and when I an in a round envierement I will start to stem ( I rub my hand together flap my hands extra) well I was in line for POTCB I had ear plugs the one that goes in your ear well between flapping my hand putting my finger in my ears to block the noise I dropped both of then on the ground ( and there was no way I was even going to look for them much less try and put then in my ears so I want on almost in tears now because I could either cover my ears with my hand or stem I just could not do both it was pretty obtuse that I was having a hard time and the guest be hind me was great ( I latter found out she had a special need child) final she asked me about the over the ears noise canceling head phone and I told her I would not be cought dead in them out in public. she asked why and I said I was too imbarised to use them she pretty much just said who care about what you need if you need them if they will make your vacation that you paid for better so what your are not going too see any of use again. she was right they were the best tool for me it was what I needed and I had to get over that fact no it does not make all my problems go away but it make it easer for me. so I would increase you to look at a mobility device as a tool just like glasses is a tool to see spell check a tool to spell hearing aid a tool to hear would you not were glasses if you had a hard time seeing or hiring aid if you could not hear probably not

    a mobility device is just that a tool to help you have a good time and for your case I can see a roller being the best thing they are small easy to use have a set ( you can get one off amazon quite cheep ( all mobility device fly free if you flay so there is that) you do not have to use it all the time you can park it in the area your in and walk bought but if you have a mobility device you can use the fire works viewing area ( and you have to have a mobility device to use them) and the fire works are not to miss. use it at the parade and so on but please do not just say no to something because your too scared imbarrised or what ever use what ever tool you need to make your vacation the best and safest it can be and have a great time.
     

    lorenae

    I'm going to Disney World!
    Joined
    Sep 12, 2015
    My issue with a mobility device isn't ego- it's just that 98% of the time I may be forced to haul it around. I'm not even taking a bag, because I hate carrying "stuff". I would only need it if forced to stand still for more than maybe 15 minutes or so, or for such a slow pace it would be like a standstill. I walk at a pretty brisk pace normally, and I don't look at all like I ever need assistance.
    This past week I was at a small amusement park and did well, but the lines moved along and were not very long. When I needed to, I sat on a bench to 'untingle' them but that was only a couple of times all day long.
    It's just that I'm so worried about being still and having my legs do that thing that they do when holding me upright and relatively still.
     

    gap2368

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Feb 27, 2015
    My issue with a mobility device isn't ego- it's just that 98% of the time I may be forced to haul it around. I'm not even taking a bag, because I hate carrying "stuff". I would only need it if forced to stand still for more than maybe 15 minutes or so, or for such a slow pace it would be like a standstill. I walk at a pretty brisk pace normally, and I don't look at all like I ever need assistance.
    This past week I was at a small amusement park and did well, but the lines moved along and were not very long. When I needed to, I sat on a bench to 'untingle' them but that was only a couple of times all day long.
    It's just that I'm so worried about being still and having my legs do that thing that they do when holding me upright and relatively still.
    The only time a line is still for more then 10 minutes is for preshow and the DAS dose nothing for them also fireworks and parade. You really should be fine without the DAS since the lines are slow moving. I would let your friend know so they can help create a little bubble for you for when you are in line.
     
  • mamabunny

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Oct 11, 2012
    As my friend @gap2368 says, creating a "bubble" in the line (where your friend stands behind you, and you allow a *small* - say, 3 feet or less - gap to form, so that you can pace a few steps back and forth) may be all you need. Pushing a rollator might not be fun, but it does give you the emergency seating that you may well need.

    Since it sounds like you are unfamiliar with the realities of a "Disney day" at WDW, I will simply echo what others have said: There are not many benches, walls or seats that are readily available; if anything, as time passes, Disney seems to remove more and more of them. Most seating you will see outdoors will be related to a "Quick Service" food stand, and will be full of patrons eating. There is no guaranteed seating anywhere in WDW, other than when you are dining in a table service venue, or your hotel room. You will find that that you may have to stand on the bus to and from your Resort as well, especially at "rush hours".

    Having a DAS in your situation won't help as much as I think you want it to - even if you have one, you will still have to find a place to sit, and that could be much further away than your legs will manage from the sounds of things.

    If I were in your shoes, I would go with the plan to try the "bubble" and then if that is not sufficient, rent either an ECV (scooter), wheelchair (which you could just push along until you needed a place to sit, or Rollator (which is a fancy walker with nicer wheels, and a built in seat, typically with a storage basket underneath) Take along a couple of phone numbers, in your phone, for reputable vendors, so that you don't have try and find a rental company on the fly. And remember that you *can* rent an ECV or wheelchair from WDW on a daily basis, but the scooters are huge and clunky, and the wheelchairs tend to be beaten half to death. Plus it's cheaper to rent from an external vendor.

    Sometimes we have to use the tools at our disposal, whether we want to or not. Personally, I *grieved* the first time I had to use a mobility device at WDW, in front of my family. I was mortified and devastated, and it wasn't until I realized that I was actually having a better trip because I hurt less and I could do more, that I began to see why I needed to use it. My family was happier because they didn't have to worry about causing me more pain or distress, and I was happier because I could go longer, and do more, and feel better. For a long time, I only had to use a mobility device at WDW, and no where else in my life. Lots of folks that you will see at WDW are that way; I would wager far less than 50% of the folks who you see using a mobility device at WDW need one in their "real" life, day-to-day at home.

    WDW isn't Italy (although there is a small section, in EPCOT's World Showcase that tries to be! 🤣 ) and I say that only so that you will realize that this will be a *very* different vacation. It's extreme in ways that are hard to quantify, especially for someone with a hidden disability, because it looks so "easy" on the surface.

    I hope you have the best possible trip.
     
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    kaytieeldr

    Post hoc, ergo propter hoc
    Joined
    Jun 11, 2005
    just a warning I feel like my spelling is more off then normal on this post I have tried but hopeful this post is readable :)
    Just so you know, even with unusual spellings, your posts are virtually always readable! Please, don't apologize.
    My issue with a mobility device isn't ego- it's just that 98% of the time I may be forced to haul it around
    Well, yes, that is a drawback of an assistive device. But it's better than collapsing on the ground when your condition attacks.
    I would only need it if forced to stand still for more than maybe 15 minutes or so, or for such a slow pace it would be like a standstill.
    These are both possible situations.
     

    lorenae

    I'm going to Disney World!
    Joined
    Sep 12, 2015
    I’ve been to Disney maybe 30 times, so I do know the reality of the day and the amount of walking I do. I lost about 7 pounds on one of my last trips. I did fine then, but didn’t have the issue of standing still at that time. For the parade, we plopped down on the curb to watch the show, and could see great. No problems with that.

    I did get run over twice with an ECV though, so grew to really dislike them. One time, I was standing still in a line (the queue went outside), and a lady tried to pull up neart me. Except she didn’t really know how to do that, and took me completely out. I was fine, and just needed ice for my knee and elbow and had only scrapes and bruises. The second time, I was just completely plowed over near a bus stop while she was looking the other way. That time I was hurt a little bit more but only lost a day of my trip. So anyway, if I needed one I would use one, but I really am glad I don’t need them.

    I appreciate all of your input. I think the ‘bubble’ is the way to go, just so I can move when my legs tingle.

    I mentioned Italy because if I can walk in Tuscany for 11+ miles, WDW really is a piece of cake. It’s flat, paved, even, etc. I am only concerned because of my inability to stand still for a long time.
     

    mamabunny

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Oct 11, 2012
    I’ve been to Disney maybe 30 times, so I do know the reality of the day and the amount of walking I do. I lost about 7 pounds on one of my last trips. I did fine then, but didn’t have the issue of standing still at that time. For the parade, we plopped down on the curb to watch the show, and could see great. No problems with that.

    I did get run over twice with an ECV though, so grew to really dislike them. One time, I was standing still in a line (the queue went outside), and a lady tried to pull up neart me. Except she didn’t really know how to do that, and took me completely out. I was fine, and just needed ice for my knee and elbow and had only scrapes and bruises. The second time, I was just completely plowed over near a bus stop while she was looking the other way. That time I was hurt a little bit more but only lost a day of my trip. So anyway, if I needed one I would use one, but I really am glad I don’t need them.

    I appreciate all of your input. I think the ‘bubble’ is the way to go, just so I can move when my legs tingle.

    I mentioned Italy because if I can walk in Tuscany for 11+ miles, WDW really is a piece of cake. It’s flat, paved, even, etc. I am only concerned because of my inability to stand still for a long time.

    Sorry you had two bad experiences with (obviously) inattentive ECV drivers. Not all of us are evil, I promise 🙂

    It's interesting that you view WDW as (relatively) flat! I'm from Oklahoma, so I *know* what "flat" looks like, and the 4 Parks are not that flat to me! LOL AK especially, but even MK has gentle hills and elevation changes, and Angus (my mobility device) gets to work out his brakes on every trip, going downhill!

    I feel like most of the Resort grounds are fairly level, as is Disney Springs (with a few notable exceptions). But I never think of "flat" when I think of WDW! 🙂
     

    lorenae

    I'm going to Disney World!
    Joined
    Sep 12, 2015
    That's funny- I live where there are lots of hills/rough terrain, but live in Florida in the winter. I think it's totally flat, with WDW just about. Of course, I was last in Tuscany where EVERYTHING is uphill. Both ways! :)
    Rome is pretty flat, but Tuscany and Liguria are very hilly, and very steep inclines. Walking 8-11 miles per day there is a workout- I LOST weight while eating pasta, rich desserts, drinking wine, and lots of great pizza and other foods.
    I'm really doing well, just worried about having a problem in one of my favorite places in the world. I'll use FP+ as I can, and hope for the best.
     

    gap2368

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Feb 27, 2015
    That's funny- I live where there are lots of hills/rough terrain, but live in Florida in the winter. I think it's totally flat, with WDW just about. Of course, I was last in Tuscany where EVERYTHING is uphill. Both ways! :)
    Rome is pretty flat, but Tuscany and Liguria are very hilly, and very steep inclines. Walking 8-11 miles per day there is a workout- I LOST weight while eating pasta, rich desserts, drinking wine, and lots of great pizza and other foods.
    I'm really doing well, just worried about having a problem in one of my favorite places in the world. I'll use FP+ as I can, and hope for the best.
    Disney is anything but flat that is for sure the rest of central FL is flat but not Disney not flat at all
     

    lorenae

    I'm going to Disney World!
    Joined
    Sep 12, 2015
    Disney is anything but flat that is for sure the rest of central FL is flat but not Disney not flat at all
    I guess it's a matter of perspective! I live in a very hilly area, and I find WDW to be flat, everywhere. The elevations, if any, are so gradual that I don't even notice.

    From my first visit in 1971 until now, I never noticed any "hills" to climb at all.
     

    gap2368

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Feb 27, 2015
    I guess it's a matter of perspective! I live in a very hilly area, and I find WDW to be flat, everywhere. The elevations, if any, are so gradual that I don't even notice.

    From my first visit in 1971 until now, I never noticed any "hills" to climb at all.
    A few that comes to mind is going into the land pavilion and going down to jungle Cruise. Walking is not bad but doing in a wheelchair and pushing or self pushing you can tell
     

    mamabunny

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Oct 11, 2012
    I guess it's a matter of perspective! I live in a very hilly area, and I find WDW to be flat, everywhere. The elevations, if any, are so gradual that I don't even notice.

    From my first visit in 1971 until now, I never noticed any "hills" to climb at all.
    Now I have to ask... Have you *been* to AK? 🤣 🤣 🤣

    I will say that because I am sitting, my perception of what is really hilly, or even steep, is probably different than the average bi-pedal Guest. 🙂
     


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