Unwanted attention from the rainbow Magic Band on a child?

bookgirl2632

DIS Veteran
Joined
Apr 24, 2006
As an ally, I wear rainbow stuff often. If people make assumptions based on that, I don’t really care. You know your child. Talk it over with him. If he wants to wear the band, whether it is because he just likes rainbows and Mickey Mouse or for a deeper reason, so be it. The important thing is that he is happy with his choice.
 

Someone28624

Mouseketeer
Joined
Feb 14, 2019
I'm straight and got the rainbow magic band because I loved the bright colors and retro Mickey vibe it had to it. It was after I had it on for 3 days that I realized "Oh, this might be for pride."

I've gotten a lot of "I like your magic band" and I had one girl ask me if you can only buy it during pride month.
 
  • Disney Frenhines

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Aug 28, 2013
    Rainbows belong to everyone, after all they are a beautiful natural phenomenon.
    Not wanting to offend anyone, but, Christians, get over yourselves, your myth about the rainbow involves genocide, so the LGBTQ use of it as a symbol is much, much nicer. So, to the OP let your son wear the rainbow band and always be there for him, that's what is most important and just remember, kids know more about things than they ever let on to their parents.
     

    old lady

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Mar 15, 2007
    The rainbow bands might not have any thing with being gay . It is wearing a elephant or donkey band. Does it make someone political?
     
  • Sjm9911

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Feb 11, 2019
    Hes 12 , get him the band, spare the talk. Have fun. If hes getting it because " he might be gay" then he knows about what it can signify. If not and its just cool , because, hey its a rainbow. The talk might not go well. The get it and have fun thing will always work out ok.
     

    VandVsmama

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Mar 28, 2011
    The average WDW visitor pays absolutely no attention to the color or design of other people's magic bands. Heck, a lot of people have a hard time paying attention to where they are walking, let alone whether or not somebody has a rainbow-colored magic band.

    Don't make it into a big deal. Your son could be gay. He might not be. Regardless, you'd probably want him to feel comfortable enough with you to be able to talk to you about this sort of thing. Don't cut off that line of communication early by essentially saying "Don't do this or that because people might think you're gay." It gives the implication that being gay is a negative thing. It'll also inadvertently send your son the message that you would not approve if he is.

    Trust me, the average 12 yr old boy has figured out a lot already about discrimination of this nature.

    ** edited to add**
    Another possibility is that he has a friend who has told him that he or she is LGBT...and maybe your son wants to show his support for this friend by wearing a rainbow magic band at WDW. OR it could be just that he likes rainbows.
     

    Spencer Wright

    Constantly craving a zebra dome...
    Joined
    Jul 31, 2017
    I know nothing about children, but I was just down in August, and rainbow merchandise seemed very popular. A lot of British tourists come then, and they really seemed to love rainbow merchandise.

    I would be really surprised if you received any negative attention.
     

    momandmousefan

    Mouseketeer
    Joined
    Mar 25, 2016
    Maybe just ask a simple “any reason you want this particular band?” in a supportive way and leave it open. Then he can tell you whether he wants to make a statement, express himself, support someone or just simply likes the band.
     
  • Chuck S

    DVC Co-Moderator
    Moderator
    Joined
    Feb 6, 2000
    Maybe just ask a simple “any reason you want this particular band?” in a supportive way and leave it open. Then he can tell you whether he wants to make a statement, express himself, support someone or just simply likes the band.
    Be wary of the tone of voice you use if you ask this question. If he does happen to be gay and perceives the tone as slightly gruff or disappointment in your voice, he could take it as meaning you would not approve. That could lead to his being reluctant to come out....and coming out is tough enough. Don't force it. It will happen on his own schedule, not yours, if he is gay.

    You could make it a different experience if you say, "Hey, I like that you're kind of making a statement and supporting a cause. I think I'll get a pink magic band to show support for those with breast cancer." And so forth. Tie each of your family magic bands to a cause, it will be really inclusive.
     

    momandmousefan

    Mouseketeer
    Joined
    Mar 25, 2016
    Be wary of the tone of voice you use if you ask this question. If he does happen to be gay and perceives the tone as slightly gruff or disappointment in your voice, he could take it as meaning you would not approve. That could lead to his being reluctant to come out....and coming out is tough enough. Don't force it. It will happen on his own schedule, not yours, if he is gay.

    You could make it a different experience if you say, "Hey, I like that you're kind of making a statement and supporting a cause. I think I'll get a pink magic band to show support for those with breast cancer." And so forth. Tie each of your family magic bands to a cause, it will be really inclusive.
    Exactly why I said “in a supportive way” No teen likes feeling pressured to talk, but many appreciate knowing that someone is there to listen and care even if they don’t feel like talking. A nice, kind question, posed simply just opens the door, but don’t push it or even make any kind of big deal. If he wants to talk to you and you open the door for him a bit he will, if he doesn’t want to talk at least he knows the door is always open and he’s welcome when he is.
     
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    kittyab

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Sep 26, 2013
    At that age I would not be too concerned with people saying anything. I doubt anyone would says something to a 12 yr old.

    Now I am surprising my 14 old with a rainbow band and ears for our upcoming trip. She came out to use last year.
     

    biochemgirl

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Oct 23, 2016
    Just thought I'd add that my son, now 14, has worn the rainbow ears, hat, pins, lanyards, etc for about 2 years. I asked him, and no one has ever said anything to him about the potential significance of wearing the rainbow gear.
     

    Disney Frenhines

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Aug 28, 2013
    Just thought I'd add that my son, now 14, has worn the rainbow ears, hat, pins, lanyards, etc for about 2 years. I asked him, and no one has ever said anything to him about the potential significance of wearing the rainbow gear.
    Hopefully because no-one is cowardly enough to do so.
     

    L&Lfan

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Jun 6, 2008
    I think there are still lots of folks out there who don’t immediately connect the rainbow 🌈 with LGBT folks and especially wouldn’t make that connection with a 12 year old wearing it. JMO
     

    nolatrekkers

    Earning My Ears
    Joined
    Sep 8, 2010
    My 17 year old son is gay and has been out to everyone since age 14. He says now that at around age 12 is when he started to realize that he was probably gay. He is very lucky in that he had no doubt about the fact that I am an ally and would be 100 percent supportive of him coming out, so when he was ready, he casually dropped the news to everyone. Your son may just like rainbows, or he may be testing the water. I don't think there is any need for a big talk, at most someone might say "cool band" or "I like your band", but just being generally supportive without making a big deal out of it is probably the best thing you can do.
     



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