Prosthetics and leg room

Discussion in 'disABILITIES!' started by GrantMcR, Sep 10, 2017.

  1. GrantMcR

    GrantMcR Earning My Ears

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    I was recently at DLR and was on TSMM when a cast member saw me twisting my legs up to get into the ride (I have a below the knee prosthetic on my right leg which can make some rides uncomfortable) and she mentioned to me that they have cars that are designed for wheelchairs that have more legroom if I wanted to use one in the future. I have been to WDW several times and never considered this as an option. Does anyone know if there are other rides where this option is available and has anyone done this before? If so, how does it work (like do I ask someone at the ride, do I have to get some kind of pass)? Thanks for any info.
     
  2. gap2368

    gap2368 DIS Veteran

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    you do not need any type of pass. When you go to the ride tell the CM at the entrance your needs that you need more leg room because of your prosthetic) and ask if they can help you out by letting you use an accessible car, but you might need a wheel chair for this, ( but I think there might be one set in the car too.)
     
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  4. Mrsjvb

    Mrsjvb DIS Veteran

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    no special pass is required, simply tell the CM at the entrance that you will need to load into a HA vehicle. some will be an extra wait as there are not many of them overall and can only have so many in service at once.
     
  5. GrantMcR

    GrantMcR Earning My Ears

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    So is there a separate line, or do I go through the standby line and ask when I get to the front?
     
  6. Mrsjvb

    Mrsjvb DIS Veteran

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    99% of alines are mainstreamed so there is no separate HA line. you may be told to go through the Fast Pass line, or be given a card to come back after a certain time period to be able to access the FP line
     
  7. lanejudy

    lanejudy Moderator Moderator

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    I suggest asking when you first approach the queue -- either standby or FP+. The vast majority of queues at WDW are mainstreamed, so even with a wheelchair people use the regular lines. Sometimes there is a pull-out to get to the accessible boarding area. For the very few attractions that the standby queue is not accessible, they may be handing out "wheelchair return times" which will tell you when to return to an accessible entrance. But for the vast majority of rides this won't occur. Just ask when you first approach the attraction, and again mention your need to any CM along the queue - especially if you do not have a wheelchair with you it won't be obvious.

    Enjoy your vacation!
     
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  8. SueM in MN

    SueM in MN combining the teacups with a roller coaster Moderator

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    This is a link to the disABILITIES FAQs thread: https://www.disboards.com/threads/d...disabled-1st-trip-next-trip-wish-trip.595713/

    You can find it near the top of this board or with a link from my signature.
    Posts 18-21 in that thread have information about access to attractions and include information regarding which attractions have a wheelchair car.
    Post 31 of that thread has information about riding attractions with a long leg cast, which has information about attractions with more leg room.

    As others posted, most lines are accessibe right to the point of boarding. You don't need anything special to use the accessible ride car - do be aware that the extra room might mean you would ride alone and have the empty wheelchair space next to you for the added space. In many cases, riding in a wheelchair won't give you extra space because the wheelchair space is 'assuming' that the wheelchair rider won't take up any more space than the wheelchair does
     

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