Finally a Diagnosis-Executive Functioning Disorder

happily single

Left foot first!
Joined
Jan 12, 2008
Hi everyone!
I don't think I have posted about the issues with my ds14, but after years of struggling with school and dealing with school based evals we finally got the results of the Neuro-Psy that I took him for.

They came up several diagnosis with the following being the primary:

1. Autism Spectrum Disorder;
2. Executive Functioning Disorder;
3. Videogame Intergration Disorder.


Previously he was diagnosed with Central Audio Processing Disorder.

My meeting with the school is the 1st week of January. I am looking for ideas on how to help my son before and after that meeting.
 

DLgal

DIS Veteran
Joined
Feb 12, 2013
Hi everyone!
I don't think I have posted about the issues with my ds14, but after years of struggling with school and dealing with school based evals we finally got the results of the Neuro-Psy that I took him for.

They came up several diagnosis with the following being the primary:

1. Autism Spectrum Disorder;
2. Executive Functioning Disorder;
3. Videogame Intergration Disorder.


Previously he was diagnosed with Central Audio Processing Disorder.

My meeting with the school is the 1st week of January. I am looking for ideas on how to help my son before and after that meeting.
Where are you located? (Country)

Autism often causes several processing and executive fuctioning issues. I've never heard of them as stand alone diagnoses. I have 2 kids with autism and one has EF deficits, while the other has audio processing issues.

Videogame Integration Disorder? Is this even a real thing? I tried to Google it, and came up with nothing. Did you mean Visual Integration Disorder?

Our schools have always done extremely thorough evaluations that included multiple tests to measure levels of cognition, identify strengths and weaknesses, determine whether there is a behavioral component, etc. They then use those results to develop an Individual Education Program with specific goals to help overcome the deficits while allowing for support and curriculum modifications, where necessary. They also provide assistive technology, speech and language therapy, and occupational therapy as needed. Did your school not do these things? If you are in the US, they are required by law to if there are concerns that your child needs additional supports due to a disability.
 

happily single

Left foot first!
Joined
Jan 12, 2008
Where are you located? (Country)

Autism often causes several processing and executive fuctioning issues. I've never heard of them as stand alone diagnoses. I have 2 kids with autism and one has EF deficits, while the other has audio processing issues.

Videogame Integration Disorder? Is this even a real thing? I tried to Google it, and came up with nothing. Did you mean Visual Integration Disorder?

Our schools have always done extremely thorough evaluations that included multiple tests to measure levels of cognition, identify strengths and weaknesses, determine whether there is a behavioral component, etc. They then use those results to develop an Individual Education Program with specific goals to help overcome the deficits while allowing for support and curriculum modifications, where necessary. They also provide assistive technology, speech and language therapy, and occupational therapy as needed. Did your school not do these things? If you are in the US, they are required by law to if there are concerns that your child needs additional supports due to a disability.
I first questioned the Videogame disorder. I thought they were joking, but the dr assured me it is a real thing. I won’t have the written report for a week so I was writing based on my memory of the diagnosis. I live in R.I. and have an older son with a diagnosis of autism and mild mental retardation. He is doing awesome. the high school went above and beyond to help him succeed. My younger(just diagnosed) isn’t so lucky with the middle school. He struggled s once 1st grade but they just tried to push him aside.
 
  • SirDuff

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Mar 19, 2014
    Videogame Integration Disorder? Is this even a real thing? I tried to Google it, and came up with nothing. Did you mean Visual Integration Disorder?
    I was intrigued and couldn't find anything either. I found video game addiction disorder and using video games as part of therapy for sensory integration disorders (and others), but nothing on video game integration disorder. I'm really curious what that means.
     

    happily single

    Left foot first!
    Joined
    Jan 12, 2008
    I was intrigued and couldn't find anything either. I found video game addiction disorder and using video games as part of therapy for sensory integration disorders (and others), but nothing on video game integration disorder. I'm really curious what that means.
    I’ll update next week with the official title, but it’s definitely Video Game disorder. It is not yet in the blue book that the doctors use for diagnostics (the name of the book escapes me)
     

    DLgal

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Feb 12, 2013
    I’ll update next week with the official title, but it’s definitely Video Game disorder. It is not yet in the blue book that the doctors use for diagnostics (the name of the book escapes me)
    Can you explain what it means?
     

    lanejudy

    Moderator
    Moderator
    Joined
    Oct 27, 2011
    My meeting with the school is the 1st week of January. I am looking for ideas on how to help my son before and after that meeting.
    Regardless of the diagnosis -- to offer suggestions, can you first give an idea of what are his struggles? Is he currently receiving any services or accommodations at school, or are you now hoping to get an IEP put in place?
     
  • digiMom

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Sep 18, 2005
    My DD is 22 years old in a few weeks and had an IEP in the schools from age three. We went along for a long time with the general diagnosis of global developmental delay. Saw several special clinics and could not get a more specific diagnosis than that. She was under an IEP as other health impaired due to lack of specific diagnosis. Her needs were assessed, and her IEP was based on those rather than a specific diagnosis.

    I would recommend focusing on what he needs, hopefully based in large part on the neuropsych evaluation. DD had one in the past year (with updated diagnosis) and part of the report was recommendations on how to move forward. If it doesn’t, I would follow up and request that. Hope that helps. Good luck!
     

    Smittolis

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Mar 2, 2017
    Can you clarify if this is an IEP team meeting, i.e. you are meeting to discuss the needs and / or the possibility of testing and immediate needs? Or is this an actual IEP meeting that is to review the results of testing and school based observations to see what they qualify for and as such put into plan an actual IEP with accommodations. They are both different and the school district timelines will vary depending on where you are.
     

    happily single

    Left foot first!
    Joined
    Jan 12, 2008
    Sorry guys. It’s amazing how busy life gets. The meeting was this week. Because the diagnosis of autism was introduced the meeting was continued until the 23rd so the special ed team could review the meeting and attend in the hopes of transition from a 504 plan to an IEP.

    His official diagnosis is:
    1. Autism spectrum disorder without intellectual impairment
    2. PTSD
    3. Frontal Lobe and Exectuive Function Deficit
    4. Obsessive Compulsive Disorder with fair insight.

    Areas of clinical concern
    1. Internet gaming obsession
    2. Sensory integration difficulties

    The entire team that was present at this weeks meeting seem sincere in wanting to get him the help and support he needs
     
  • DisneyOma

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Jul 27, 2015
    I've heard about the new video game diagnosis - it should include all electronics, IMO. While it is a new diagnosis, it should be categorized under OCD, I think?

    Glad to hear the school is supporting the diagnosis and wants to create a plan for success!
     

    SunbeamStarbeam

    Earning My Ears
    Joined
    May 5, 2019
    I find all the "screen time" diagnoses to be part of a pop psychology that seeks to punish children for living in a world of technology. I can see it from the diagnostic's perspective, easy money to make from parents ignorance of the internet and video gaming.

    The thing is for people with Autism the world is scary. Taking away the few things that bring them some comfort and safety because you don't understand it only breeds mistrust. It shames children already suffering from stigma being disabled. All so some lazy person wanting easy cash by feeding into parental paranoia about technology can get paid.

    We live in a world of technology. Either parents join their kids or they will be left behind. For some reason parents believe over-punishing their Autistic kids about this, or trying to steer their interests to something else is appropriate. Why is it okay to do this to kids who already have less joy than others in life?

    I grew up with gaming and fortunately parents who respected that. Creating a diagnosis that does nothing but create one more thing an Autistic person has to fight for access to because of how they were born? That's sadistic. It only pushes kids away from their parents, and teaches them not to trust. I mean, how do you sleep knowing you made the lives of those already suffering worse, guess the cash is that good.

    Those are my thoughts on video game disorder. As someone with a type of mental disability I rebelled against the gatekeeping or forever childing of disabled people. If I hear anyone mention screen time I look at them with sympathy for their children. It's hard being a child, and now how you relax is being persecuted by psychiatry cause I don't know, they got bored?

    There are worse things than gaming disorder. The destruction of the child's ability to trust their parents. A child learning manipulation means survival, meaning they'll make a friend to play Nintendo with behind your back. The "addiction" diagnosis abusively states enjoyment itself is a problem. You'll have a child who doesn't tell you what they enjoy, who hides from you.

    How do I know this? My father used my Autism misdiagnoses to try and make me a forever child. I became anxious because any sign of independance was another reason to protect me from myself. I stayed in my room for years only talking to my imaginary friends, because my interests were denied to me.

    I now have CPTSD, from years of being emotionally abused and to an extent held captive. Screen time frightens me, it will mean there are going to be more adults like me. Who are fearful to trust because they've had their interests used to control them all their lives. Imagine if what you enjoyed was policed the way screens are to children? Children who are socially stunted because they were prevented from contact with the outside world for their own good.

    How much of Autism really is Autism, or a diagnosis of symptoms of a overcontrolled child. Giving their abusers new ideas of how to instill learned helplessness into their children is not helpful. Taking away something from a child already suffering that they enjoy is cruel. The model of addiction is based on emotional manipulation. If someone is dying on Heroin/Fentanyl yeah it's needed. For a child who enjoys gaming, it teaches them at any time anyone who wants to take from me can. That I need to be on constant guard because people cannot be trusted to not hurt me. My behavior is what others base my ability to access enjoyment on, so I'll learn how to act in a way that pleases everyone.

    You end up with a broken child, so submissive they'll just let others hurt them, they've been raised to believe that's all they're good for. Who doesn't talk to you, who is off in their own world. We've successfully created a diagnosis that's incredibly easy to hide abuse under, because the message is Autistic people need to be raised more like pets, less like human beings.

    A person who believes gaming is an addiction is blissfully unaware of what real illness is. My cousin died from Heroin. You punish and restrict your children enough you'll drive them to drugs because they've been punished seemingly for existing. Then you'll go, "Oh! I see now! Suddenly my child playing video games doesn't seem so bad compare to them putting needles up their arms, because I was so controlling they needed to dissociate from me!"

    All so some college kid can get paid for preying upon parental paranoia of technology. It shouldn't have to be said, but a child who feels they must hide an aspect of themselves from you will grow up frightened and insecure.

    I had a panic attack because a therapist tried using screen time against me upon seeing me playing the Nintendo Switch. Within 2 minutes they had me crying I was a good girl. This is emotional abuse, creating fear and control. When anything other than being perfectly functioning person decides if you can have enjoyment, a person will resort to behaviors that seem "addictive". They're trying to escape living with a monster who sees them happy and says, "How can I use this against them to make them behave how I want them to?" You'll have a empty hollow child who just goes through the motions to get what they want. No happiness, just "I better do well at work, get good grades, or I'll be imprisoned again." A child who becomes obsessed with perfection to a point of Anorexia, because perfection means someone will rescue you. Who grows up terrified of making mistakes, who cannot relax because they might step on the wrong eggshell and be punished again.

    You'll have an obedient pet instead of a child after all of that. All because you insisted screens were evil, you end up with a child afraid of others and themselves. But I guess that's better than playing video games, right?
     

    NotUrsula

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Apr 19, 2002
    A person who believes gaming is an addiction is blissfully unaware of what real illness is. My cousin died from Heroin. You punish and restrict your children enough you'll drive them to drugs because they've been punished seemingly for existing. Then you'll go, "Oh! I see now! Suddenly my child playing video games doesn't seem so bad compare to them putting needles up their arms, because I was so controlling they needed to dissociate from me!"
    I'm really sorry that you have the issues with your parents that you do, but that doesn't change the fact that video or internet gaming, just like casino gaming, CAN be addictive, and that addiction CAN rise to harmful levels. Is it always an addiction? No, of course not. Can it be? Oh, you bet your bippy.

    Let's say that you've got a casino in your town. Now, if you go to that casino once a month or so, stay a couple of hours, maybe play $100, then gaming for you is probably a harmless pastime. If you regularly skip work (or worse, quit a job) in order to spend more time at that casino, and lose your rent or grocery money every single month, then that is really not a healthy place for you to be going, because you lose all control the minute you walk over the threshold, AND the drive to get over that threshold as often as possible outweighs every other motivation in your life.

    Now, let's say you have a gaming console or gaming PC in your living room. The same kind of standard applies, though since there is no cash on the line, playing somewhat more often is probably reasonable. So, let's say you play 3 hours a week, in your leisure time, and not when you are supposed to be working or sleeping. You sometimes speak to others in the room while you play, and you never skip any meals or develop a locked-up gut from the tension of playing. In that situation, it's a harmless pastime.

    New scenario: You have a gaming console (or more likely, PC) in your bedroom. Looked at in daylight, the controller or keyboard has caked-in grime in every construction seam, because your hands sweat when you hold it, and you are always holding it. You play upward of 10 hours out of every 24, and you often blow off work or sleep to play. You are always faced with the choice of gaming or eating, because you feel like taking time to leave the room to eat is gaming time wasted. You sometimes get constipated, because you don't want to get out of your chair for regular bathroom breaks, so you often choose to hold it. You don't shower daily, but showers, snack runs and potty breaks are the only reason that you do come out. If someone IRL tries to make conversation, you launch into intricate descriptions of your games, but leave the conversation if the subject changes. THAT is gaming addiction, and it is crippling, because that kind of addict is just as unlikely as an alcoholic to be able to be a self-supporting member of society -- perhaps even less so.

    ANY pastime that becomes all-consuming and adversely affects one's ability to get enough sleep, keep up with schoolwork, or make a living is a pastime gone wrong. Anyone who loves a person falling prey to that will want to intervene in some way to break the compulsion, because being controlled by a compulsion is not emotionally healthy in any way. If you cannot self-regulate the time you spend doing that thing, then you need outside help to do so.
     
    Last edited:

    bookwormde

    <font color=darkorchid>Heading out now, another ad
    Joined
    Mar 16, 2008
    A lot of what the evaluator is indicating is not DSM-V diagnosises but rather are individual presentations and characteristics.

    EF sensory and social differntials are all part of ASD. PTSD is common for our kids when sociatey has tried to make them nerotypical

    One of the common EF differenital is a genetic rewrite of parts of the frontal lobe from non linnear social capabilities to more direct intelectual areas math, art etc. also done through non linear processing.

    what clinicalns call OCD in ASD is in great part a natural component of ASD commonly referred to as special areas of interest and can be a strong vocational gift,

    Video input is feels like a very natural non linear input for our kids so they often naturally gravitate to it often to escape the trauma of neurpotypical expecations and abuse. It is often quite theraputic for decompression. address the stressors and the dependence on this decompression tool will decrease.

    Being a successful parnet of the child with ASD takes a lot of research and work but the outcomes are amazing when their gifts blossom

    This is just a quick blurb of a few of the many areas that you need to undertand in depth.

    Since I have not been active on DISboads for a while, Just a breif bio so you know some of the background of my thoughts

    My aspie is now 21 and is at our state university working on multiple degree programs, I am a volunteer advocate for scores of other ASD kids and other special needs kids and a state educational system advocate (DOE and legislative)

    Last thought-While there are good IEP teams out there, you will need to be the specialist about the needs of your child.
     

    bocaj1431

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Oct 16, 2012
    Hi. I am sure it must be somewhat of a relief to find a diagnosis but at the same time overwhelming too. My teen son was diagnosed with an autism spectrum disorder 15 years ago. I wanted to share just a few important tips.

    First, if you can find a support group of other parents with children on the spectrum, I highly recommend joining. I gained sooo much from finding a support group.

    Find a local Autism organization. You can check with Autism speaks and the Autism Society for local chapters. I would not have been able to provide the best for my son without the assistance of our local organization.

    Never fully trust your public school is providing the most appropriate program for your child. If you have the time, I would learn the laws of your state concerning Autism And the state guidelines. Being a part of a local support group, local Autism organization, and my own personal experiences, has highlighted how difficult it is for public schools to provide the appropriate program for kids on the spectrum. The majority of parents I know have had extreme difficulty getting their child’s needs met at the public schools. I am not saying it is not possible and I am not saying that the teachers are not the best. It’s just there is only so much funding for public schools, which often means a special needs child may not be getting the most appropriate program for their specific needs, especially when dealing with Autism. My son was outplaced by the school to a school for children with Autism and he has gained so much more than he ever could in our towns public school system. Again, that does not mean public schools can’t provide an appropriate program for kids with ASD. So if you can, learn the laws and then make sure your school is actually providing what they are required to by law.

    Lastly, I highly recommend Michelle Garcia Winner. Check out her books on her webpage. She is really at the top of the field with children on the spectrum. She also offers trainings throughout the US, which I found extremely helpful. Also, checkout this book, SMART BUT SCATTERED TEENS: The “Executive Skills” program for helping teens reach their potential. You can purchase it on Amazon for $16. My son’s therapist recommended it and it is extremely helpful.

    I wish you the best on your journey!
     


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