Dolphin hotel is cutting power from 2am-5am

Discussion in 'Disney Resorts' started by FSU Girl, Mar 14, 2019 at 10:13 PM.

  1. Searc

    Searc Mouseketeer

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    The restroom would be dark at 3am regardless of whether the power was off or not. lol
     
  2. Dug720

    Dug720 DIS Veteran

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    I would hope that someone with mobility issues would not book a high floor - and would make that fact known when making the reservation if “high floor” is not a category like it is in some places.
     
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  4. Disneylover99

    Disneylover99 DIS Veteran

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    As we all know, ground floor is not a bookable category in most cases at any hotel, only a request. If someone can’t do stairs, period, it’s not going to matter if they’re on the second floor or the top floor.
     
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  5. AngiTN

    AngiTN DIS Veteran

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    Just about any hotel I know of has a night light type of thing in or around the bathroom. Heck, the ones at Disney are so bright we have to dampen their light with a towel or something. I like the older versions that were motion sensitive and in the ceiling or something, and come on only when you walked into the room

    That said, we could manage in a power outage, with a phone if nothing else.
     
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  6. AngiTN

    AngiTN DIS Veteran

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    They may not BOOK a ground floor but a hotel probably does take into consideration where they place someone with mobility issues in the event of an emergency and an outage with the elevator. The last thing they want is an issue of a guest on a floor they can't get off of. I'd think that's a no-no, no?
     
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  7. Dug720

    Dug720 DIS Veteran

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    No, but high floor is a bookable category in many hotels (not Disney-owned, but the Swan and Dolphin are not Disney owned, so they may have it as a category).

    BUT if you are unable to manage stairs, you should make that known when booking a hotel. And also research to ensure that they have ground-floor rooms as some do not.
     
  8. nkereina

    nkereina Last chance to lose your keys.

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    As mentioned up-thread, these things aren't always planned that far in advance. Perhaps they were notifying as soon as they knew.

    If I needed a light or an alarm, my phone would work for that. I don't use the bathroom light if I go during the night anyhow, my eyes would hate me! I'm not sure how many weddings happen on a Thursday that they'd need to be up at 5am for photos...

    The flight factor is a fair point. I would imagine that's a small number of guests that would be inconvenienced. If it was a real issue that compensation couldn't fix, I would think the Dolphin could move that guest elsewhere for the night.
     
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  9. Disneylover99

    Disneylover99 DIS Veteran

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    I’m not really sure it is a consideration for hotels anywhere. My sister has been in a wheelchair most of her life and she travels a lot. Sometimes a main floor handicapped room is a bookable category, but more often then not, it’s not.
     
  10. Disneylover99

    Disneylover99 DIS Veteran

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    Of course you should let them know. But the reality is, there are generally fewer rooms on the main floor of any hotel. Spas, restaurants, gift shops, health clubs, pools, etc....often take up most of the space on the first floor. There are often several handicapped accessible rooms in hotels these days, but they are not always on the ground floor.
     
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  11. hedberg1661

    hedberg1661 DIS Veteran and Patreon Supporter

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    This happened to us at the Dolphin a few years ago. They gave us glow sticks to use during the night to find the bathroom.
     
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  12. Wild4Walt

    Wild4Walt DIS Veteran

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    I wonder what they do with people who use CPAP - that effects my husband greatly. I know thengs can come up but it can be a health issue for some.
     
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  13. AngiTN

    AngiTN DIS Veteran

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    I wasn't saying bookable at all, but assignable at the hotel, when they know, would be something else entirely.
    So if there was an emergency in the hotel she's totally on her own to get out? When obviously she's not going to be able to use stairs or get out, leaving her trapped with no way to escape in the event of a fire, for instance. Folks in charge of ADA are ok with that? Truly amazing as much as they regulate everything else.
     
  14. Disneylover99

    Disneylover99 DIS Veteran

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    Yep. When she travels alone, she's on her own. I can't tell you how assignable works. Does it depend on how many handicapped people are already checked in? I don't know. I believe it works differently everywhere.

    The reality is, a wheelchair bound person is going to be trapped anywhere if the elevator goes down and they're not on the main floor, whether it's an office building, restaurant, hotel, etc...Maybe each building/company has their own contingency plan for when this happens. I have no idea.
     
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  15. Jcon

    Jcon Mouseketeer

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    Standard emergency plans for any building where a someone with mobility issues cannot use the stairs, is to remain in the room (or office) and wait for emergency response personnel.
     
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  16. fla4fun

    fla4fun DIS Veteran

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    I went through a siliar issue at WL once. I woke up the moment the power went off because the room went totally silent. It did get stuffy in the room, and I couldn’t get back to sleep until the power came back on. Fortunately I didn’t have any early plans for the next day. The power was off almost three hours for that one.
     
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  17. Disneylover99

    Disneylover99 DIS Veteran

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    Makes sense. There's really not much more you can do.
     
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  18. hedberg1661

    hedberg1661 DIS Veteran and Patreon Supporter

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    We had this issue with my family and they walked us to the Swan where they did have power as they were doing this in phases.
     
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  19. sndral

    sndral DIS Veteran

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    Interesting, where I volunteer (a large public facility) our instructions are to get those unable to use stairs to the stairwell, if possible get them out w/ the special stretcher/chair located in that area, if not possible to use the stretcher/chair, get the most people you can out, but leave any you can’t in the stairwell w/ the fire rated door closed & of course when you report in at your designated spot advise of the location of those still in the building.
    Thus, I’ve always assumed that most stairwells in modern buildings have fire rated doors and are the safest places to wait for rescue.
     
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  20. Jcon

    Jcon Mouseketeer

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    That's probably correct for that facility. Depending on building codes, I've seen some suggest moving people close to fire escapes or remain in the their offices/rooms.

    I'm curious about your plans. If you move people to the stairwell, do they not become a hindrance or "fire" hazards themselves?

    One of the biggest issues remains communicating the whereabouts of anyone trapped in a building to proper officials. Knowing who's left, where they are and ensuring that is communicated to emergency responders is key. That doesn't work well in a hotel, where people are transient and don't know the emergency plans. They also don't "check in" anywhere.
     
  21. kaytieeldr

    kaytieeldr Post hoc, ergo propter hoc

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    If, if, if. If my grandmother had wheels, she'd be a trolley car. Typically at night in Florida in March, heat/humidity would not be uncomfortable.. As for emergencies, the hotel would have a contingency plan.
    Are you saying that all future hotel reservations should include the question, "if we happen to need to turn off power for a few hours once while most people are asleep, is this acceptable or do you want us to cancel your reservation?"
    Most likely the hotel would work with them to place them on a low floor so they could use the stairs. Everybody already there for at least one night can reasonably expect to have been informed around the 24 hour mark dansdad mentioned, so would have already been accommodated.
    We had a fire here a few years ago (six floors.) Firefighters carried my paraplegic neighbor and wheelchair down from the second.
    Probably they would have been relocated for medical reasons. Or they could choose to stay, and just not breathe well for those few hors. But I'm betting they relocated.
     

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